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Links on R&P from around the web

Colin Kaepernick vs. Tim Tebow: A Tale of Two Christians on Their Knees

posted on September 25, 2017

For The Washington Post, Michael Frost writes that two Christian football players’ differing displays of faith represent a divide in Christianity. Tim Tebow and Colin Kaepernick both kneel on the football field, but for different reasons, Tebow in prayer and Kaepernick in protest. Frost writes, “In many parts of the world it feels as though the church is separating into two versions, one that values personal piety, gentleness, respect for cultural mores, and an emphasis on moral issues like abortion and homosexuality, and another that values social justice, community development, racial reconciliation, and political activism.”

Read at The Washington Post

Nashville Church Shooting: Masked Gunman Kills Woman, Injures Seven in Antioch, Police Say

posted on September 25, 2017

The Tennessean’s Joel Ebert, Natalie Allison, and Anita Wadhwani report, “One person was killed and eight others wounded Sunday after a masked man opened fire following a church service in Antioch.” The 25-year-old alleged shooter, Emanuel Kidega Samson, accidentally shot himself after being confronted by an armed member of the church. Ebert, Allison, and Wadhwani write, “Although it’s unclear if race or religion played a role in the shooting, authorities, including the federal Justice Department, have opened a civil rights case.”

Read at The Tennessean

New Order Indefinitely Bars Almost All Travel from Seven Countries

posted on September 25, 2017

The New York Times’s Michael D. Shear reports, “President Trump on Sunday issued a new order indefinitely banning almost all travel to the United States from seven countries, including most of the nations covered by his original travel ban, citing threats to national security posed by letting their citizens into the country.” Beginning next month, most citizens from Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Chad, and North Korea will be banned from entering the United States. Anthony D. Romero, the executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union, said, “The fact that Trump has added North Korea – with few visitors to the U.S. – and a few government officials from Venezuela doesn’t obfuscate the real fact that the administration’s order is still a Muslim ban.”

Read at The New York Times

Will the Rohingya Exodus Be Aung San Suu Kyi’s Fall From Grace?

posted on September 25, 2017

TIME’s Elizabeth Dias writes about Aung San Suu Kyi’s failure to address Myanmar’s persecution of the Rohingya, a predominantly Muslim ethnic group. The human-rights icon is “the de facto leader of Myanmar’s civilian government.” Ben Rhodes, President Obama’s Deputy National Security Adviser, said, “She sees herself very deliberately now as a political actor inside of a changing Burma, not as an icon that essentially speaks out on human rights.” Dias adds, “Pope Francis will visit Myanmar in late November, followed by a visit to Bangladesh. The Vatican established diplomatic relations with Myanmar just four months ago, under his leadership, and unlike Suu Kyi, he has regularly defended the Rohingya by name.”

Read at TIME

5 Wheaton College Football Players Face Felony Charges in Hazing Incident

posted on September 21, 2017

Chicago Tribune’s Christy Gutowski and Stacy St. Clair report, “Five Wheaton College football players face felony charges after being accused of a 2016 hazing incident in which a freshman teammate was restrained with duct tape, beaten and left half-naked with two torn shoulders on a baseball field.” James Cooksey, Kyler Kregel, Benjamin Pettway, Noah Spielman, and Samuel TeBos are being charged with aggravated battery, mob action, and unlawful restraint, after a judge signed their arrest warrants Monday afternoon. “The conduct we discovered as a result of our investigation into this incident was entirely unacceptable and inconsistent with the values we share as human beings and as members of an academic community that espouses to live according to our Community Covenant,” said LaTonya Taylor, a spokeswoman for the conservative Christian school.

Read at Chicago Tribune

Mormons Are Among the Few Who Want Less Federally Protected Land. Their History Explains Why.

posted on September 19, 2017

For The Washington Post, Christine Colbert, whose ancestors were some of the first Mormons, explains why many Mormon lawmakers and constituents are opposed to government control of land. She writes, “My pioneer ancestors believed that Utah was their promised land, given to them by God to use, and that they were supposed to improve upon nature, letting none of it go to waste.” Colbert adds, “The idea that Utah’s public land should be controlled by the progeny of a small group of white settlers is alive and well among some modern-day Mormons, and they support acquiring federal land as an effort to ‘take back’ what they believe is rightfully theirs.”

Read at The Washington Post

This Rosh Hashanah, a Passionate Call to Action

posted on September 19, 2017

Religion News Service’s Yonat Shimron reports that as Jews gather to celebrate the Jewish New Year this week, rabbis across the country are using their sermons to speak about pressing issues including anti-Semitism. Shimron writes, “To many of the nation’s rabbis, most of whom opposed Trump in the general election and skew liberal on social issues, the Republican administration’s actions have been deeply disturbing. So much so, that a group of Reform rabbis meeting in a closed Facebook page drafted a joint sermon they expect will be used by hundreds of rabbis on Rosh Hashanah, which begins Wednesday evening (Sept. 20).” Rabbi Suzanne Singer of Temple Beth El in Riverside, California, said, “The priestly role is to make sure you’re there for people in times of need. But there’s also a prophetic role: We can’t accept what’s going on. Are we waking up to this or not?”

Read at Religion News Service

Could Father Mychal Judge Be the First Gay Saint?

posted on September 18, 2017

For Slate, Ruth Graham writes about the efforts to canonize the late Father Mychal Judge, a fire department chaplain who died in the north tower of the World Trade Center in 9/11. Judge, who identified as a celibate gay man, also spent his career supporting gay individuals who were exiled from the church. Graham writes, “At a time when some doctors were still afraid to touch or even treat AIDS patients, Judge cradled dying men in his arms, administered the Eucharist and the last rites, spoke at their funerals, and comforted their families and friends.” Salvatore Sapienza, a gay pastor who worked with Judge before leaving the Catholic Church says that canonization would “bring Mychal to millions more people.” Sapienza also said that Judge “love being Catholic,” but he also “love being gay.”

Read at Slate

St. Louis Rabbi Vows Synagogue Will Remain Sanctuary for Protesters

posted on September 18, 2017

Haaretz’s Anat Rosenberg reports that the Central Reform Congregation in St. Louis provided refuge from police to those protesting Friday’s acquittal of former police officer Jason Stockley. Rosenberg writes, “The synagogue’s act of kindness garnered plenty of gratitude from the demonstrators, but also elicited hateful responses on Twitter from neo-Nazis and anti-Semites using the hashtag #GasTheSynagogue.” She adds, “The synagogue remains undeterred, though, proceeding with scheduled events in the wake of the protests and foregoing extra security beyond what was already in place for the High Holy Days.” Rabbi Susan Talve said of her congregation: “We were founded on theses values of standing with each other in difficult times.”

Read at Haaretz

Jesuit Priest Stands Up for Gay Catholics, Then Faces Backlash

posted on September 18, 2017

The New York Times’s David Gonzalez reports that the Rev. James Martin is facing backlash for “Building a Bridge,” his new book that encourages dialogue between the Roman Catholic Church and LGBT Catholics. Gonzalez writes, “Conservative Catholics have called him ‘effeminate,’ a ‘homosexualist,’ ‘a heretic,’ ‘pansified’ and guilty of ‘leading young men to perdition.’ In recent weeks, campaigns by people opposed to him have prompted three high-profile Catholic groups to disinvite him from events where he was to have been the featured speaker.” The Jesuit priest said, “If we can’t even begin a dialogue without a charge of heresy, then we need to take a good look at how we understand the gospel.”

Read at The New York Times